Just lunch dating service local

Besides giving users the right to a full refund for three days after signing up, it limits a service's charges to 0 for six-month periods.

The fee limit has slowed the growth of dating services, compared with those in other states.

just lunch dating service local-9

He uses neither computers or videos, but in this tightly regulated market, few competitors can afford to do so either. "I know exactly what I'm looking for." One triumph of his company, Field's Exclusive Service, involved a Saudi Arabian prince who requested a blond, blue-eyed woman living on the Upper East Side. Practitioners insist that there are no secrets in this field.

But intuition, empathy and a sense of humor seem to help mightily. Mc Ginty huddled with Yvonne Opffer, director of the New York office of It's Just Lunch, to match people.

It came to New York in May and has signed up 286 clients. Obstacles range from higher costs to the limits that the state places on the fees such services can charge.

Even finding an office was tough because landlords suspected It's Just Lunch was an escort service. Mc Ginty and her partner, Margaret Kunkler, the trickiest part has been New Yorkers themselves.

Winston employs a private detective to check customers' criminal, financial, educational and marital records. Winston charges the $500 fee permitted by law, guaranteeing two years of once-a-month dates with separate people, if necessary.

She also demands a note from their doctors indicating that they are free of communicable diseases. She then writes up a separate contract for love-coaching and image-consulting, one stipulating a payment of ,000 or even more. Winston claims 22 marriages, though it is a source of some disappointment that many somehow forget to invite her to their nuptials. "There's still a stigma attached." Another upscale matchmaker is Kathryn Hason.

For instance, the California-based Great Expectations, with branches in 44 cities, refuses to come here. Ads in places like The Village Voice and New York magazine have shot up in popularity and profitablity with the advent of interactive answering messages.

The company, which allows clients to screen potential dates through videotaped interviews, charges

She also demands a note from their doctors indicating that they are free of communicable diseases. She then writes up a separate contract for love-coaching and image-consulting, one stipulating a payment of $2,000 or even more. Winston claims 22 marriages, though it is a source of some disappointment that many somehow forget to invite her to their nuptials. "There's still a stigma attached." Another upscale matchmaker is Kathryn Hason.For instance, the California-based Great Expectations, with branches in 44 cities, refuses to come here. Ads in places like The Village Voice and New York magazine have shot up in popularity and profitablity with the advent of interactive answering messages.The company, which allows clients to screen potential dates through videotaped interviews, charges $1,000 to $2,500 a year. In 1990, The Voice started taking personals for free, then charging people who called to answer them as well as those who called to retrieve the answers $1.75 a minute.They find them more alienated, less willing to look you in the eye.Many are demanding: a 50-year-old male atheist wanted only female atheists in their 30's.Called It's Just Lunch, it fixes up clients for lunch dates at Manhattan restaurants, where the service makes reservations in first names.

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She also demands a note from their doctors indicating that they are free of communicable diseases. She then writes up a separate contract for love-coaching and image-consulting, one stipulating a payment of $2,000 or even more. Winston claims 22 marriages, though it is a source of some disappointment that many somehow forget to invite her to their nuptials. "There's still a stigma attached." Another upscale matchmaker is Kathryn Hason.

For instance, the California-based Great Expectations, with branches in 44 cities, refuses to come here. Ads in places like The Village Voice and New York magazine have shot up in popularity and profitablity with the advent of interactive answering messages.

The company, which allows clients to screen potential dates through videotaped interviews, charges $1,000 to $2,500 a year. In 1990, The Voice started taking personals for free, then charging people who called to answer them as well as those who called to retrieve the answers $1.75 a minute.

They find them more alienated, less willing to look you in the eye.

Many are demanding: a 50-year-old male atheist wanted only female atheists in their 30's.

Called It's Just Lunch, it fixes up clients for lunch dates at Manhattan restaurants, where the service makes reservations in first names.

||

She also demands a note from their doctors indicating that they are free of communicable diseases. She then writes up a separate contract for love-coaching and image-consulting, one stipulating a payment of $2,000 or even more. Winston claims 22 marriages, though it is a source of some disappointment that many somehow forget to invite her to their nuptials. "There's still a stigma attached." Another upscale matchmaker is Kathryn Hason.

For instance, the California-based Great Expectations, with branches in 44 cities, refuses to come here. Ads in places like The Village Voice and New York magazine have shot up in popularity and profitablity with the advent of interactive answering messages.

The company, which allows clients to screen potential dates through videotaped interviews, charges $1,000 to $2,500 a year. In 1990, The Voice started taking personals for free, then charging people who called to answer them as well as those who called to retrieve the answers $1.75 a minute.

They find them more alienated, less willing to look you in the eye.

,000 to ,500 a year. In 1990, The Voice started taking personals for free, then charging people who called to answer them as well as those who called to retrieve the answers

She also demands a note from their doctors indicating that they are free of communicable diseases. She then writes up a separate contract for love-coaching and image-consulting, one stipulating a payment of $2,000 or even more. Winston claims 22 marriages, though it is a source of some disappointment that many somehow forget to invite her to their nuptials. "There's still a stigma attached." Another upscale matchmaker is Kathryn Hason.For instance, the California-based Great Expectations, with branches in 44 cities, refuses to come here. Ads in places like The Village Voice and New York magazine have shot up in popularity and profitablity with the advent of interactive answering messages.The company, which allows clients to screen potential dates through videotaped interviews, charges $1,000 to $2,500 a year. In 1990, The Voice started taking personals for free, then charging people who called to answer them as well as those who called to retrieve the answers $1.75 a minute.They find them more alienated, less willing to look you in the eye.Many are demanding: a 50-year-old male atheist wanted only female atheists in their 30's.Called It's Just Lunch, it fixes up clients for lunch dates at Manhattan restaurants, where the service makes reservations in first names.

||

She also demands a note from their doctors indicating that they are free of communicable diseases. She then writes up a separate contract for love-coaching and image-consulting, one stipulating a payment of $2,000 or even more. Winston claims 22 marriages, though it is a source of some disappointment that many somehow forget to invite her to their nuptials. "There's still a stigma attached." Another upscale matchmaker is Kathryn Hason.

For instance, the California-based Great Expectations, with branches in 44 cities, refuses to come here. Ads in places like The Village Voice and New York magazine have shot up in popularity and profitablity with the advent of interactive answering messages.

The company, which allows clients to screen potential dates through videotaped interviews, charges $1,000 to $2,500 a year. In 1990, The Voice started taking personals for free, then charging people who called to answer them as well as those who called to retrieve the answers $1.75 a minute.

They find them more alienated, less willing to look you in the eye.

Many are demanding: a 50-year-old male atheist wanted only female atheists in their 30's.

Called It's Just Lunch, it fixes up clients for lunch dates at Manhattan restaurants, where the service makes reservations in first names.

||

She also demands a note from their doctors indicating that they are free of communicable diseases. She then writes up a separate contract for love-coaching and image-consulting, one stipulating a payment of $2,000 or even more. Winston claims 22 marriages, though it is a source of some disappointment that many somehow forget to invite her to their nuptials. "There's still a stigma attached." Another upscale matchmaker is Kathryn Hason.

For instance, the California-based Great Expectations, with branches in 44 cities, refuses to come here. Ads in places like The Village Voice and New York magazine have shot up in popularity and profitablity with the advent of interactive answering messages.

The company, which allows clients to screen potential dates through videotaped interviews, charges $1,000 to $2,500 a year. In 1990, The Voice started taking personals for free, then charging people who called to answer them as well as those who called to retrieve the answers $1.75 a minute.

They find them more alienated, less willing to look you in the eye.

.75 a minute.

They find them more alienated, less willing to look you in the eye.

Many are demanding: a 50-year-old male atheist wanted only female atheists in their 30's.

Called It's Just Lunch, it fixes up clients for lunch dates at Manhattan restaurants, where the service makes reservations in first names.

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